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Don't Call It a Comeback: Jammie Thomas Copyright Infringement Claim for File Sharing Lowered to $54,000

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By: Corey Tate
July 25, 2011
 

It's time to revisit the never-ending tale of copyright infringement with the RIAA's copyright infringement lawsuit against suspected P2P file-sharer Jammie Thomas-Rasset She was sued into oblivion by the RIAA for multi-million dollar sums and kept appealing her way to bigger decisions ... against her.

Now U.S. District Court Judge Michael Davis has decided that the last judgement of $62,500 per song was too high, and lowered it to $2,250 per song. That brings the (not so) grand total down from $1.5 million to a much more manageable $54,000.

"The court is intimately familiar with this case. It has presided over three trials on this matter and has decided countless motions. It has grappled with the outrageously high verdict returned in a case that was the first of its kind to go to trial. The court is loath to interfere with the jury's damages decision. However, the Constitution and justice compel the Court to act," he wrote in his decision.

What's more ironic: the fact that Jammie Thomas-Rasset kept appealing her way to bigger fines or that she was way overpaying for some downright sub-standard music? Def Leppard? Richard Marx? Guns N' Roses? That's a hefty price tag for songs that you might want to be payed to be forced to listen to, rather than $62,500 per song.

The court battle: in one corner there was Jammie Thomas-Rasset, accused of copyright infringement for using KaZaA to download and offer for distribution almost 1,700 songs. In the other corner was the tag team of EMI (Capitol Records), Sony BMG (Arista Records) Vivendi SA's UMG (Interscope Records) and Warner Music Group (Warner Bros. Records) all represented through the RIAA (Recording Industry Association of America); they offered that this was copyright infringement based on the premise that offering these files through KaZaA, Jammie was distributing the music and they felt that was illegal.

The RIAA Hit List: Some of Jammie Thomas-Rasset's 24 Songs
Def Leppard - Pour Some Sugar on Me
Richard Marx - Now and Forever
Journey - Faithfully, Don't Stop Believing
Destiny's Child - Bills, Bills, Bills
Guns N' Roses - Welcome to the Jungle, November Rain
Vanessa Williams - Save the Best for Last
Janet Jackson - Let's Wait Awhile
Gloria Estefan - Here We Are
Aerosmith - Cryin'
Reba McEntire - One Honest Heart

 

Tags: Grooveshark, Digital Music News

 
 
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